Nude Hiking in a National Park – Know Before You Go!

Nude Hiking in a National Park – Coronado National Forest

National Parks may have secluded areas where nude hiking is totally possible – even frequently occurring. Of course, one must be cautious not to offend visitors that do not appreciate nudity or who might even dial 9-1-1 to report your activity. But if you chose areas where nude hiking typically occurs, the hikers you encounter will probably be as nude as you.

If you are among the many that like to get-back-to-nature by finding a remote (spelled private) area where you can take your clothes off and meander au naturel through the outdoors, there are many hidden places around America where you can make this happen.

Unlike Europe, our American Puritan instincts make outdoor nudity more difficult in the United States, but one of my favorite spots for nude hiking is located at Tanque Verde Falls. It’s been a popular naturist area for many years.

Tanque Verde is just east of the city of Tucson, Arizona in the Coronado National Forest. After leaving the pavement, a dusty road takes you into the park and to an area where naturists take it all off. Although I don’t recommend it, some visitors do hike nude from the parking area to the popular spots.

A note of caution: Tanque Verde Falls is situated in a narrow canyon. At the north end of the canyon, the rocky terrain flattens out and becomes a giant funnel that feeds sudden rainfall into the canyon. After a heavy rain (which may seldom occur at Tanque Verde itself), the water levels can rise rapidly, and few people have the strength to swim in the currents. There are reports of several hikers who have been swept to their deaths in an unexpected surge. So have a quick exit route planned out before you become sleepy in the day’s sunshine.

As you hike into the canyon, the first naturist area will be found where the falls is located. In a dry season, the cliffs are about 30 feet tall. These become the location of waterfalls when water rises as mountain snows melt or heavy rain falls upstream. Otherwise, typically there is a sandy beach or large flat rocks to sunbathe on. This area is the easiest to access and is frequented by straight singles and couples.

Gays and lesbians generally hike about half a mile further up the canyon following well-beaten paths to an area above Tanque Verde Falls itself. Descending the main path is not difficult, but it’s a steep climb down, and presents a more demanding climb out of the canyon after hikers are tired from exposure to the hot sun.

Once you have reached the riverbed, off with the clothes – keeping your hiking boots on. (I recommend you take an old pair of canvas walking shoes since you may have to wade through some pools of water a foot deep.)

This area is like a Garden of Eden in the middle of the desert. Just be sure to pack water and perhaps some beer or wine. And don’t forget a sandwich or snacks. There are no services nearby.

Enjoy yourself. But beware of nature’s dangers. I’ve been watched by a rattling rattlesnake, and I once almost stepped on a hissing gila monster. You will observe white frogs, beautiful song birds and birds of prey, and of course many saguaro cactus among other desert plants and flowers.

Have a naked hike!

Categories of Camping Tents

Before you could certainly proceed on your future adventure for holiday or vacation to the famous outdoors you ought to ensure that you have all the suitable camping gear to make the special occasion remarkable and memorable. Going camping is a stupendous encounter as well as the one that is embraced by individuals of various age groups. Being perfectly equipped will allow you to enjoy your outdoor adventure.

Regardless of whether you are venturing into the great outdoors or staying at a structured campground, an appropriate camping tent needs to be at the very top of the checklist. They come in a dizzying range of models, designs, and sizes. It’s extremely important you ultimately choose a camping tent that is designed to have capacity for the number of individuals who are planning to doze off under the roof. In some cases it might be more comfortable to have multiple tents which also allows for additional storage space.

You should consider using a tent pad which is made of a strong suitable material that will prolong the life of your tent. The tent pad should be smaller than the tent footprint to prevent water running inside. Try and avoid walking with shoes and heavy hiking boots on inside the tent because it damages the tent pad and tent floor.

Prior to starting your hunt for the perfect tent, have an idea what amount you’re willing to invest. Also consider the environment you plan on camping in as well. Tents with good tent pads and a footprint will give the best service to its user. The end results will be impressing with or without rain.

Camping tents are categorized by using three ratings: three season tent, four season tent, and all season tent. The three season camping tent is ideal for spring, summer and fall. They can hold up in moderate weather including light snow, rain and the wind. These tents most often have mesh panels for ventilation as well.

The four season tent is ideal for extremely chilly temperatures, heavy snow and strong winds. The four season tents are made of thicker, and more durable fabric which make them weigh more also. Something you will need to consider if you are backpacking.

Apart from the periodic classification, you will find backpacking tents and ordinary tents. Backpacking tents are easily portable which makes them fast and easy to set-up. The largest sized backpacking tent I would suggest is probably a three man tent. This could certainly give two individuals sufficient room for sleeping and storage as opposed to having a larger one which might be too heavy to carry in your backpack.

What’s the most appropriate dimensions of a camping tent (not a backpacking tent)

The size and weight of a camping tent doesn’t really make a difference, as long as you’re capable to carry it from your car or truck to the camping area and it accommodates in your vehicle along with all of your other camping supplies. Camping tent capacity is founded on the number of individuals who can comfortably doze off inside the tent. Take for example, a standard two man tent will fit in two individuals and most likely have very little space for storage. A reputable principle is to always purchase a camping tent which holds a capacity rating of two people in excess of the

number that will be utilizing it. This will create additional space to extend a bit and store your gear equally.

In the event that you’re carrying out family camping, the multi-room tents operate awesome. Multi-room tents are available in 2-room fashions, where the accommodations are segregated by an inside camping tent wall with a zippered doorway. The 3-room model has the two rooms, as well as an additional screen room, which is perfect for storage and for changing clothes, playing games, etc. Family cabin tents are perfect when you have small children.

More features to lookout for are:

A rain-fly to keep the rainwater off

Folded seams and even double stitching to help keep the rain out

A waterproof tub surface also keeps water out

No-see-um meshing to keep insects away

Strong zippers that withstand with constant utilization

When it rains while you are camping or perhaps your camping tent is moist once you strike camp, you should layout the tent in the yard to air-dry it out whenever you get home. This assists protection against mildew together with fungus. Clean and dry tents promote good health to the user.

Packing a Backpack

Packing a backpack is not rocket science but it does require some attention to details if you want to avoid minor frustrations like having to stop and dig something out of the bottom of the pack.

While there are some variable to consider like climate, duration of your trip, type of backpack you own and a few others, there are some basic principals for packing a backpack that you can adapt to practically any situation.

First, pack for comfort. One factor that greatly affects your level of comfort while backpacking is the weight distribution of your gear. Basically, you want the heavier gear in the middle of your pack. Also, make sure the total weight of the backpack is evenly distributed on each side.

Second, pack for accessibility. Make sure that the items you need more often are easier to get to. A good plan is to pack in layers starting on the bottom with your sleeping bag, followed by your tent, then your bedroll, cooking gear, toiletries, first aid kit and, finally, food.

Your clothes can be packed according to the need to balance the weight of your gear. If the heavy equipment is too far down, add some clothes underneath it, otherwise, place your clothes on top.

Besides the top of your pack, use the side pockets for things you need to grab quickly. Some of these items might include your rain gear, snacks, water bottles, insect repellent, maps, gloves, etc.

Another accessibility issue deals with gear that goes together. Pack items that are used for similar purposes near one another in your backpack.

Finally, pack for prevention. Pay special attention to the following tips so that you an avoid ruining your gear. Keep plastic and loose fabric away from zippers. If caught, you run the risk of damaging your gear, breaking the zipper or both.

Keep anything that has liquid contents upright and, if possible, in a hermetically closed bag. Any hazardous materials or products that could stain your clothes or destroy your food should be packed in outer compartments.

There are two final tips that make packing a backpack an easier task. One, begin early. Give yourself plenty of time. You are more likely to forget important items or pack badly if you are under pressure to get it done quickly.

The second tip is to make a list of all the items you want to pack in your backpack. Once completed, prioritize the items. Include essential gear at the beginning of the list and stuff you would like to take but are necessary towards the end.

When you start the packing, begin with item number one. Go down the list until your backpack is either full or reaches a weight that you are comfortable with.

Now you’re ready to hit the trails.

Doggin’ Northern Virginia: The 10 Best Places To Hike With Your Dog In NOVA

Have you ever considered how far you walk with your dog? If you walk just 15 minutes a day you will have walked far enough in your dog’s lifetime to cross the United States. With all that walking ahead of you, aren’t you ready for a new place to take a hike with your dog in northern Virginia? Here are NOVA’s best trails to hike with your best friend…

1. Sky Meadows State Forest

When you place your park on the Blue Ridge Mountain mountain slopes far removed from eight-lane roads clogged with traffic you have to work hard not to be the best place to hike with your dog in Northern Virginia and Sky Meadows does not disappoint. The real star here are the meadows – your dog can’t hike through any better.

2. Mason Neck State Park

A half-dozen canine hiking options through an attractive oak/holly forest on paw-friendly soft dirt are pretty enough you will want to complete them all with your dog. If you have time after lingering on the best beach for your dog in Northern Virginia.

3. Prince William Forest Park

The many miles of wooded trails in the largest swath of protected land in the Washington DC metropolitan area are refreshingly uncrowded – always an attraction for canine hikers. The trails are wide enough for a pack of dogs to travel easily over and well-marked.

4. Great Falls Park

You may come for the spectacular views of the Falls of the Potomac but you’ll stay for the canine hiking on wide trails that take your dog through a variety of habitats and the ruins of a Colonial canal town. Hold the swimming for someplace else, however.

5. The Battlefields of Manassas

Two five-mile interpretive hikes examine the year-apart clashes of the North and South across this Civil War battlefield. For your dog these hikes offer the best mixture of open field and wooded trail hiking in Northern Virginia.

6. Claude Moore Park

This eastern Loudoun oasis serves up a pastiche of a dozen short trails that add up to more than ten miles of canine hiking. You get your choice of two trails that circle the park, both of which visit Little Stoney Mountain for long views at Sugarloaf Mountain in Maryland.

7. Fountainhead Regional Park

Fountainhead is a trail user’s park. there are trails set aside for horses and for bikes and the white-blazed pedestrian trail is a snaking, two-mile excursion around wide ravines and through airy woods. For real canine adventures you can set out on the 18-mile Bull Run-Occoquan Trail.

8. Leesylvania State Park

There are three loops to enjoy with your dog in Leesylvania – the star being the Lee’s Woods Trail. This canine hike packs history aplenty into its two sporty miles atop the bluffs overlooking the Potomac River. For easy hiking with your dog take the Potomac Trail as it weaves through the former waterside amusement park that was part of the gambling gambit. Plenty of beach and swimming time for your dog here too.

9. Harpers Ferry National Historic Park

Few places in America pack as much scenic wonder and historical importance into such a small area as Harpers Ferry National Historic Park where the Shenandoah and Potomac rivers join forces. Your dog can sample hikes in three states here – up the mountain at Maryland Heights, through the town in West Virginia and across the Appalachian Trail in Virignia.

10. Mount Vernon

America’s most-visited home is dog-friendly to the core – the gate attendants provide a bowl of water for canine visitors. George Washingtn would have it no other way. The Father of Our Country is also the Father of the American Foxhound. He bred a new type of fox hunter with dogs from his friend Marquis de Lafayette and English hounds. The President favored silly names for his beloved dogs: Drunkard, Tipler, Tipsy.

Hiking The Amicalola River Trail

From the canoe ramp near the gravel parking lot on Georgia 53, follow the loop trail towards the river. This is where Class IV whitewater rapids can be found. Famously known as the “Edge of the World”, this was formed by the Brevard Fault Line. Climbing into the Dawson Wildlife Management Area, the mountains and the brook provide a serene picture of wildlife and its habitat. Yet, whether some may consider the Amicalola River as a creek, it doesn’t really matter if a nature hike and adventure are what you’re looking for. Although owned by the City of Atlanta, the management of the areas resources are split among three state departments. The current agreement set is that the Georgia Forestry Commission manages the forest resources while wildlife protection and maintenance is managed by the Georgia Department of Natural Resources.

However, people are prohibited from visiting a certain portion of the area of approximately four acres, wherein a 10 mega-watt nuclear facility is situated and operated by Lockheed. These prohibited areas have high radiation levels and are strictly monitored by scientists for radioactive readings. So do not stray and be observant with the trail signs and route directions. Start at the parking lot road and take the path furthest from the road towards the boat ramp. From this point, canoers and kayakers begin their wild ride with the class IV white water rapids which can take half a mile towards the river end.

For hikers and trekkers, take the south side to a gravel parking area to begin the Amicalola River Trail. An alternate route to the wooden stairs near the parking lot takes you to the bridge called Georgia 53. Turn left at the end of the bridge and you’ll find a 30-foot rock wall. Pass the old covered bridge gateway, further half a mile the trail leads you to the rapids. Check for blue rectangular blazes or an arrow above a brown sign on your way to the climb. A few feet further, take a 90 degree turn where a double blaze can be seen. Be attentive not to miss this since there is a fairly visible trail nearby which is usually taken by trekkers by mistake.

Continue to follow the blazes towards a “T” and then turn right towards another climb to the highest ridge of this trail. Several species of flora can be seen along the way as you traverse and you may come across some small streams. About 1.7 miles, the trail climbs to a flat ridge which leads you to its highpoint area where picnic tables and a dedication post for Jason Funk, a boy scout who died in 1991, is located. Proceed to the path turning left at the Forest Service Road and look for another double-blazed sign. Then follow the footpath which leads to a wooden bridge which ends your trail at Highway 53.